Instagram Round-up: Tucson

A few photo friends and I decided to meet in Tucson a couple weeks ago to talk shop, pick each other's brains, share new work, meet up with our photo mentor, and attend photographer Masao Yamamoto's lecture and exhibition opening at the Etherton Gallery. (And also do whatever else we felt like doing.) We created our own conference, and are already thinking about next year's plans to meet up again (all photo friends are invited!)  It was truly an inspiring week. Here is my short collection of Instagram images from the trip:

 Our Lady of the Pinecones

Our Lady of the Pinecones.  This little backyard shrine was tucked into an alcove at our Airbnb. She wound up meaning a lot to me, coming to represent the guardian of all the new ideas and plans for my art projects that surfaced during this trip. I don't have to worry about a thing, because Our Lady's got my back. 

 Fox on the mantel

This little guy was the first thing I noticed when I walked into the living room of our Airbnb.  He is the CUTEST.  

 Backyard planter

Backyard greenery.  I loved this.  It took us forever to figure out that the building behind this planter was a garage.  We thought it was the host's house because it looked too pretty to be a garage, so we were extra quiet and didn't walk around the yard.  The house manual kept mentioning a garage though, and finally we went looking for it, only to discover that it was staring right at us the entire time.  Lol!

 Swan's house

Swan's house.  Four years ago I took a photograph of this tree.  I thought I should take one this time too.  I loved spending the morning on Swan's back porch, soaking up all I learned during my photo consult and waiting for Elizabeth to finish hers.  (While eating delicious, fresh-out-of-the-oven vanilla poppyseed pound cake.) (And helping Catherine un-stick a cholla from her finger.  Those things are crazy!)

 Prickly Pear

Prickly Pear cactus, photographed on the drive up to Phoenix.  We chose to go the long way that wasn't a highway, so that we could stop if we saw something interesting.  There wasn't all that much time in between leaving Tucson sprawl and entering Phoenix sprawl.  But oh well.

 Tanoue Shinya 

We visited the Phoenix Art Museum, and got through it in a bit of a hurry as we were going to meet another friend of mine for lunch.  Even in a hurry, though, there is always something that makes you stop and really look.  I loved this sculpture by Tanoue Shinya. It reminds me of waves on a deserted island that's the texture of maple tree helicopter seeds.

 Cornelia Parker,  Mass (Colder Darker Matter)

I'm always drawn to big installation pieces, even if I don't understand what they're necessarily about. Things hanging from the ceiling, something that takes up an entire room, maybe video and sound and three-dimensional objects all combined into an experience.  This one was very straightforward and so beautiful: Mass (Colder Darker Matter) by Cornelia Parker. These were the charred remains of a church that was struck by lightning.  It even looks like it's in the middle of exploding. Mass. Science and religion in the same word.

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The Lisa Sette Gallery.  After lunch in Phoenix, we popped in to see what exhibits were up and chat with Lisa a bit.  Of course, what do I photograph... ?  the doorway on the way out.

 Orange patio table and chairs

Patio chairs and table at the Airbnb. This was my favorite place to sit.  Sunshine-y but shady, and big enough for us all to share our projects, drink tea (or Woodford, depending on when you stop by), and cheer each other on to do all the good work we want to do this year.

 Kitt Peak

Kitt Peak, looking out from my favorite cliff.  I hemmed and hawed about whether to drive all the way out there or not, but after taking Elizabeth to the airport I just couldn't NOT turn west instead of north.  I hope it's in the cards this year to go back and stay for more than a couple hours.

Thank you, Tucson.  You never fail to deliver just the right mix of art, outdoors, great company, and a kick in the pants to get my work done!

Photo-an-Hour: New York

I thought a day in New York would be the perfect opportunity for a photo-an-hour post.  Here goes...

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8:30am - Breakfast with Lynn at the Eveready Diner in Southeast.  She wasn't going to be able to come to the city with me, so we thought we'd at least start out with breakfast together before she dropped me off at the train station.

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9:30am - Hillary. Sigh...

 American Flag, Grand Central Station

10:30am - Ahhh... Grand Central Station. Being here never gets old.

 International Print Center New York

11:30am - On the train I looked up "print museum New York" just to see what would turn up. I had no idea I'd discover the International Print Center New York. Their current exhibit, Just Under 100, is the fifty-sixth presentation of its New Prints Program, a biannual, juried open call for prints that included 98 international artists. 

 Framed prints

I loved seeing so many different printmaking techniques all displayed in one space.  It makes me look forward even more to getting started at the printmaking co-op once fall comes.

  Louise Eastman, Jess Frost, Tara Geer, Katie Michel, Wendy Small, and Janis Stemmermann. Miss 2017. Letterpress. 20 5/8 x 16 1/2 in. Printed by Leslie Miller, published by Planthouse, NY. Edition: 15. Courtesy of Planthouse, NY. © 2017 the artists.

Louise Eastman, Jess Frost, Tara Geer, Katie Michel, Wendy Small, and Janis Stemmermann. Miss 2017. Letterpress. 20 5/8 x 16 1/2 in. Printed by Leslie Miller, published by Planthouse, NY. Edition: 15. Courtesy of Planthouse, NY. © 2017 the artists.

 View from a Chelsea window

12:30pm - The view from the IPCNY elevator hallway.

 Cape and dress, Museum of the Fashion Institute of Technology

1:30pm - Thought I'd pop into the Fashion Institute of Technology's museum since it was just down the street a bit. Their current exhibit, Forces of Nature, focused on how nature and science has influenced fashion and even vice-versa. For example, beautiful bird feathers found their way onto hats and couture clothing in the late 19th and early 20th century, but demand for plumage rendered several species nearly extinct and ushered in protection laws which still exist today.

The cape (1920) and dress (1953) above were inspired by new concepts and technologies that brought the far reaches of space closer to ordinary citizens. 

 A Typographical Romance, Typefaces from the 1920's

2:30pm - The Center for Book Arts.  I spent some time looking at exhibits & books and poking around their studios.  What a special place! One of their current exhibits, Animation & Printing, presents "a selection of short animated films from around the US and the world, each created using techniques common in the book arts such as letterpress printing from moveable type, wood type, pressure printing, lino and wood cut, etching, silkscreen as well as animation in watermarked paper." 

I loved seeing how artists were using printed material in digital ways.  Just because we create something in one medium doesn't mean we can't present it in more than one format!

 Boxes of fonts

Boxes of fonts!  (drooling here...)

 Emily Martin, Desdemona In Her Own Words

This was such a powerful piece.  Emily Martin's Desdemona In Her Own Words. While this photo only shows a single print from the folio, visit Emily's website to see the animation and learn more about the work.

 Pasta at Eataly

3:30pm - Agnolotti at Eataly.  Heaven on a plate!

 Cityscape in the Garment District. New York.

4:30pm - On my way to Mood Fabrics! 

 Rolls of fabric at Mood Fabrics

I knew Mood would be overwhelming, and it was, but in a fun way.  I DID find the red silk velvet I was looking for to make my new "singing" dress (for jazz caroling during the holidays), and I took photos of other fabrics that caught my eye.  I'm a little more cautious now about what I buy when I'm excited in a fabric store (or a paper shop or a greenhouse or a...) I don't want to come home with TOO much. So now I'm going through my photos, narrowing down the choices. I'll either stop in quickly on my way back to Ohio or order online.

 Trims at Mood Fabrics

5:30pm - I loved looking at all the trims.  I could have taken home every one of these, even if I don't necessarily have a use for any of them yet :-)

Just as I was paying for my velvet, the Project Runway designers & crew showed up. Too funny. I guess they're filming the next season!

 Gotham Writers Workshop

6:30pm - Gotham Writers Workshop. They've got a Friday night "write-in" where you're given a writing prompt (which you can use or ignore), take some time to write, and share your work with the group if you want.  Then there's wine & cheese & good cookies, and then you repeat the process. It was fun! I didn't write to the prompts, nor did I share what I wrote (and to me, 15 minutes of writing time -- even if it's twice -- isn't enough.) But that's okay.  I'm glad I went and I was able to talk with a couple staff members about their online classes.

 View of building windows. Cityscape.

7:30pm - The view from Gotham's 14th floor window.

 Times Square cityscape at night

8:30pm - Finished and walking back to the subway.  Needless to say, I slept on the train.  Goodbye for now, New York!